TRUE TRANQUILITY 

Wisdom Story: “True Tranquility”
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“Once upon a time in ancient China, the Emperor was in his study, looking over volumes of diplomatic documents. He found it hard to concentrate, so he summoned his most trusted Minister. When the Minister arrived, he saw that the Emperor was pacing back and forth, looking irritable.

The Emperor said to him: “I wish to focus on the affairs of the state, but my mind is unsettled and agitated. When I feel like this, I need something I can look at to help me regain tranquility. Have the best artist in the land create a painting that has the power to calm me down. I want the theme of this painting to be ‘True Tranquility.’”

“As you command, Your Majesty.”

A few days later, the Minister reported that there were three artists widely considered to be the best in China. They were equally talented, so he brought all of them into the palace. Once they understood what the Emperor wanted, they began to paint.

When the work was done, the Emperor went into the studio with the Minister to see for himself. The first painting they looked at depicted a placid lake surrounded by mountains. It was a beautiful scene; the surface of the lake seemed perfectly still and conveyed a peaceful feeling. The Emperor smiled: “This is beautiful.”

The second painting showed a snowscape. It evoked the silence after a snowfall, a deep silence that went beyond mere lack of noise, because the snow banks absorbed all sound. Both the Minister and the Emperor nodded their approval. “Very insightful,” said the Emperor.

They looked at the third painting, which featured a waterfall. “I am sorry, Your Majesty,” the Minister said. “It looks like this artist did not understand my instructions to paint a scene of serenity. Let me discard this painting, and we can choose from the first two.”

He reached for the painting, but the Emperor stopped him: “No, wait.” He stared at it for a moment longer, and then said: “This is the painting for me.”

“What? But – Your Majesty! How can this waterfall compare to the other two in representing tranquility? I do not understand!”

“The waterfall is not the most important thing in this painting,” said the Emperor. “Look again.”

The Minister took another look at the painting, more carefully this time. He saw that there was a tree next to the waterfall. One of the branches of the tree held a nest. A bird was sleeping inside that nest.

“See how the bird is able to relax and rest even though the deafening torrent is so close to it,” the Emperor pointed out. “It has such a profound quietness within that external conditions have no power to irritate or disturb. Now that is the essence of True Tranquility!””

When was the last time the you compare yourself to the little bird in the nest it wasn’t disturbed by the raging water fall?

What do you do now to cope with the stresses of life that you can share with others to help them too?

Written and compiled by Paulette Motzko 

High definition Wallpaper Images from Zedge. 

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wisdom.stories.daily

The Giving Tree

This story is so sad but beautifully illustrates how we should try and do and give everything we possibly can to our parents while we can.

The tree this gives mangoes is a metaphor for our parents and the boy represent every child.

One day they will need us and since they gave us LIFE itself,  we can create extraordinary memories to draw back on of the TIME we spent with them.
Paulette Le Pore Motzko

November 6th 2016 9:27 a.m.

Wisdom Story: “The Giving Tree”
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“Once upon a time, there lived a big mango tree. A little boy loved to come and play around it everyday. He climbed to the tree top, ate the mangoes, took a nap under the shadow… He loved the tree and the tree loved to play with him. Time went by, The little boy grew, and he no longer played around the tree.
One day, the boy came back to the tree with a sad look on his face. “Come and play with me,” the tree asked the boy. “I am no longer a kid, I don’t play around trees anymore.” The boy replied, “I want toys. I need money to buy them.” “Sorry, I don’t have money… but you can pick all my mangoes and sell them so you will have money.” The boy was so excited. He picked all the mangoes on the tree and left happily. The boy didn’t come back. The tree was sad.

One day, the boy grown into a man returned. The tree was so excited. “Come and play with me,” the tree said. “I don’t have time to play. I have to work for my family. We need a house for shelter. Can you help me?” “Sorry, I don’t have a house, but you can chop off my branches to build your house.” So the man cut all the branches off the tree and left happily. The tree was glad to see him happy but the boy didn’t come back afterward. The tree was again lonely and sad.

One hot summer day, the man returned and the tree was delighted. “Come and play with me!” The tree said. “I am sad and getting old. I want to go sailing to relax myself. Can you give me a boat?” “Use my trunk to build your boat. You can sail far away and be happy.” So the man cut the tree trunk to make a boat. He went sailing and didn’t come back for a long time.

Finally, the man returned after he had been gone for so many years. “Sorry, my boy, but I don’t have anything for you anymore. No more mangoes to give you.” The tree said. “I don’t have teeth to bite,” the man replied. “No more trunk for you to climb on.” “I am too old for that now,” the man said.

“I really can’t give you anything, the only thing left is my dying roots,” the tree said with sadness. “I don’t need much now, just a place to rest. I am tired after all these years,” the man replied. “Good! Old tree roots are the best place to lean on and rest. Come sit down with me and rest.” The boy sat down and the tree was glad and smiled.

Moral: The tree in the story represents our parents. When we are young, we love to play with them. When we grow up, we leave them and only come back when we need help. Parents sacrifice their lives for us. Never Forget their sacrifices. Give them Love and Care before its too late.”

You must read “The Giving Tree” by Shel Silverstein, which is what this story was abridged from. It is really an adult book told them very childlike an easy to understand way.

Thank you for telling me the author of this Jennie.

Written and Compiled by Paulette Motzko

Updated November 7th 2016

 9:52 a.m.

Photography by Paulette Motzko

Mom and my last Thanksgiving together.

Image of mom-Ramona Le Pore, me-Paulette Motzko, and dad-Ernest Le Pore by Paulette Motzko 

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wisdom.stories.daily

Story from Wisdom Stories