Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much. – Helen Keller. Commentary by Paulette Le Pore Motzko

This simple but very poignant quote comes from my childhood heroine who is still my adult heroine today.

She formed many of my viewpoints on what “disabled” people can do at an early age. We all have some kind of disability, big or small, it’s how we view it that makes all the difference. We can downplay or highlight it.

Make the most of your intelligence, abilities and skills.

Helen Keller accomplished more in her lifetime without seeing or hearing then many have ever done in their entire life blessed with vision and hearing.

If you ever desire to read an extraordinary book on the free audio book app called LibriVox….look up Helen Keller and you’ll find enough reading material to keep you inspired for weeks.

Once you install Librivox-based on the Latin prefix Librivox-based meaning book, and vox meaning voice.

Listen to “The World I Live In” by Helen Keller.

It will change the way you look at your world forever.

Read “Optimism” also by her on Google Play Books.

If those two don’t make you aspire to greatness, I don’t know what will!

Written and compiled by Paulette Le Pore Motzko.

Red Quote Image from Pinterest.

Nick Belman was the photographer in the pool hall shot. Paulette Motzko- digital photo artist.

Other images by Paulette L. Motzko, PLM Studios.

Copyright 2015, 2016, 2018.

August 7th, 2017. 6:41 p.m.

Light House by James Taylor & “A Lighthouse is what I Hope to Be” by Paulette Le Pore Motzko

I am so surprised I have never heard this beautiful song by James Taylor and that it wasn’t played more when it came out years ago, and isn’t played more now. 
His music got me through high school and it’s still getting me by. Between his melodic harmonies,  beautiful guitar playing, and wisdom filled words…he’s still got it and illustrates how you can get better as you get older

Like James Taylor’s beautiful song,

 I  want to be a lighthouse that shine’s a ray of hopeful light out for all to see…

I want it lead the way to safety and more positive and hopeful paths for others.

I have treaded tragic paths so gruesome it would shock most people and I don’t think the average person could have lived and survived through it. I know they wouldn’t have.

Fortunately I wasn’t made average though, and I am always adapting each day, doing the best with what parameters I am given.

I have lived through a literal hell of health problems, striving for better times while making most of the least, while becoming more.

 I had to become strong, industrious and good at research to find the answers to my medical dilemmas and to get answers on how to find my cure to intractable catamenial epilepsy. There is no cure, but with the right medicine, doctor, diet, sleep and winning attitude, I am doing very well. After all, when you have everything to gain from finding the answers, you look harder and relentlessly. 

 When you do find life changing answers to help yourself, you can also help others with it as well and possibly even make history….which gives me great joy at the mere thought. 

In spite of all the hell and lack of friends throughout my life, who I thought had integrity but found friends who are not genuine when they discover you are “different” from them and don’t like you unconditionally as I do with others.

 I always focused on what my abilities were and all the positive aspects of my life. Being dealt a disability-epilepsy at nine years old; that is all I have known. My best and first friend was blind like Helen Keller, and she was genuine and thoroughly as accepting of me as I was her. I learned qualities like compassion and empathy early though, unlike most kids. 

Those earliest memories helped form my character who us one who sees the beauty in all people.

I continually tried to push to the limits, erasing the word DIS and maximizing the word ABILTIES.

I hope and pray one day my disability will simply fade away like a ship in the bleak of night, passing the lighthouse on by, letting my light shine as it was always supposed to.

I hope one day my light will shine so brilliantly, like an aurora borealis crystal, sparking so bright that people forget and simply don’t care that I was “disabled” at all….but know my special talents far way anything else. 
Written by Paulette Le Pore Motzko,

Images from Zedge

Compiled by Paulette Motzko

Copyright June 23rd, 2017

12:23 midnight

Updated 7:03 a.m.

Seeing This Will Remind You of The Good in the World….

http://ewtn.mpl.miisolutions.net:1935/ewtn-live-1/smil:dome.smil/playlist.m3u8

And in the hearts of us all.

In any country in the world you can go to http://www.ewtn.com and view the station live even if you don’t have a TV you can watch it.

 There are masses, prayers, rosaries and all kinds of inspirational programming for adults, young people and kids.

Below image from Zedge.

Even if you are not a prayerful person, or you’ve never been baptized before, or even if you are Jewish, Protestant or Muslim or Buddhist or whatever your religion might be, turn it on anyway. You just may enjoy it once you shut off your preconceived ideas about it.

Below image from Zedge.

 We have a commonality we share simply as human beings with the potential to believe. We all have souls that need a faith based life.

When we are companions with Jesus, our path is paved in gilded walk ways we only need open the communication line to reach HIM. That is what prayer is to me….
Image below photographed by Paulette Motzko from St Frances DE Sales Catholic Church in Las Vegas, NV. 

 A dialog with your best friend in life and confidant-The Lord.

Beautiful image of a statue of The Virgin Mary & Sacred Heart of Jesus taken by my dear friend Leonardo Valencia. Edited by Paulette Motzko.

We’re the same no matter what race we are or what we believe in, or what we say our religion is.  We’re people and we can benefit from sharing, and caring and praying and finding the time TO MAKE FAITH FIRST AND THE REST WILL BE BLESSED.

Written and compiled by Paulette Motzko

JUNE 6TH, 2017 1:20 P.M.

I, for one, love strength, daring, fortitude. I do not want people to kill the fight in them; I want them to fight for the right things. Helen Keller

Helen Keller Says: “I, for one, love strength, daring, fortitude. I do not want people to kill the fight in them; I want them to fight for right things.”

One of the earliest known pictures of Helen Keller with her extraordinary teacher Anne Sullivan. She was my role model since I was 9 years old diagnosed with epilepsy. I discovered her and playing piano I’m cooking, and writing, it is very early age and very pivotal age in my life. I realized after reading what she did dealt with what she had to deal with that I could do anything I put my mind to do, if I only wanted to badly enough.

Later picture of Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan,  also from Pinterest, . Photographer unknown.

Anne Sullivan brought Enlightenment to Helen Keller’s life. Before Anne Sullivan entered Helen Keller’s dark and Silent world, she didn’t understand why she was there and didn’t understand that everything had a meeting and everything had a name in this world. I suggest you read any of the books that Helen Keller wrote. Your life and your attitude will be forever changed. She was brilliant and it was Anne Sullivan that brought out that brilliance hiding like a tulip waiting to bloom buried deep in the Earth.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.helen.keller.daily

From Helen Keller daily.

Image’s from Pinterest, photographers unknown.

Written and Compiled by 

Paulette Le Pore Motzko.

January 17th 2017. 8:34 a.m.

I seldom think about my limitations, and they never make me sad. Perhaps there is just a touch of yearning at times; but it is vague, like a breeze among flowers. –             Helen Keller

Helen Keller Says: “I seldom think about my limitations, and they never make me sad. Perhaps there is just a touch of yearning at times; but it is vague, like a breeze among flowers.”

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.helen.keller.daily

Compiled by Paulette Motzko

Image from Pinterest from 

http://www.VeryBestQuotes.com 

November 2016 9:19 a.m.

Three free things I thank God everyday of my life for ….

Helen Keller Says: “Three things I thank God every day of my life for:

 Things that he has vouchsafed me knowledge of his works

Deep thanks that he has set in my darkness the lamp of faith.

Deep, deepest thanks that I have another life to look forward to–a life joyous with light and flowers and heavenly song.”

Image from Pinterest.

Compiled by Paulette Motzko 

October 19th, 2016 9:15 a.m.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.helen.keller.daily

Some People Feel the Rain and Others Just Get Wet….

Image

Truly Seeing The World Around You by Paulette Le Pore Motzko

Copyright March 2013

I love what this said in that it illustrates that some really don’t truly live but go through life blinders on to the sights, scents and amazing small miracles they encounter. When we open up our world to the sights and scents and all the experiences in life, we truly live.

For instance, here is a great exercise to become better at TRULY SEEING LIFE. PRETEND YOU ARE EXPLAINING WHAT YOU ARE SEEING AND EXPERIENCING TO SOMEONE WHO IS BLIND.

I had a great friend when I was younger who was blind and I used to explain in glorious detail what I was seeing for her and only wished she could see what I did. I also had a client who was blind and had epilepsy and he called me for help when I was the CEO/Founder of The Epilepsy Connection. It was Friend & Family Day at The Braille Institute and none of his family wanted to go with him, so I became his family and was honored.

If you have never volunteered your time at The Braille Institute, or been there it will literally “open your eyes” to some of the most courageous and intelligent people you will ever encounter. I wore a blind fold to simulate blindness and then cooked (or at least tried to) with the blind fold on. It didn’t go very well because I had no grasp of where things were from each other and I realized what blind people have to go through on a daily basis to do even the most simple things.

Then I wore goggles to simulate being partially blind, which was worse than the other, because things looked distorted and out of focus. Then they gave me a can to walk with and we were supposed to find our way home, with an assistance, who gave directions and described in glorious detail what I was coming up against and allowing my ears to make up for my eyes.

In the center of The Braille Institute in Anaheim on Dale is a beautiful fountain with crystalline waters flowing from it. I have always loved fountains and the charm of them but had no idea there was a distinct reason why the fountain was there. Do you know why it was there?

It was to give orientation to all the people there who had vision impairments-blind or partially blind. They could sense where they were from the center of the building.  My senses were not in tune with it and I never really got a sense for where I was at, but I had an even deeper appreciation of people who were blind, who taught many of the courses and looked just like anyone else. Epilepsy and blindness have several things in common:

1. They are permanent disabilities

2. They are for the most part invisible to others

3. They make those whose lives have been touched by it gain a deeper appreciation for the world around them.

4. Anyone can acquire epilepsy or blindness if the right set of circumstances arose

In my case, I was diagnosed with epilepsy when I was 9 years old and was a very sick child passing out all over the place and it took awhile to find a medicine gave me the control I now have. Consciousness, uninterrupted normalcy was a highly appreciated thing and compassion was a thing I learned at a very early age, along with big words, and hanging around with people who were 30 years my senior because the “kids” my age didn’t understand what I was going through and were not nice.

Going back to the name of this post/article, the next time you go outside on a pretty day, pick up a pen and paper and write down what you see. I mean, really write it down as though you are seeing for the first time and are explaining to someone who cannot see. It will change your world forever.

Paulette Le Pore Motzko

St. Patrick’s Day 2013

Life is a Succession of Lessons Which Must Be Lived to be Understood

Image

When I was a child of 9 years old I was diagnosed with complex partial epilepsy and little would I know that it would take many years to find a drug named Tegretol to find control in my freshman year of high school before I knew what health meant.

My best friend in 5th grade was a blind smart girl named Cheryl Lightcap, and I have always thought she was aptly named. She spoke with a southern accent and sat in the back of the class with her braille machine. That year the book drive came around and I ordered the story about Helen Keller’s life. On the back of the book it had the braille alphabet on it and I would practice trying to read it and was always fascinated by my friend Cheryl who would so effortlessly read pages and pages of heavy brown braille paper.

Her hands were calloused from reading all the books in braille she did. I was so proud to walk with her and amazingly she could touch what I was wearing and know what color it was-light or dark. I would describe what I saw to her and tell her about the day, if it was sunny and what the kids were doing-other than us.

I would bring cook books and read them in a pink book bag and find a table to read in. The kids didn’t like me because I was different and that stayed that way until Tegretol was introduced in my freshman year of high school. I was able to attend school with the rest of the kids, not miss so much school and not have to work quite so hard. Then boys who made fun of me in years past wanted to “be my friend” of which I wanted no part of. I was the same person, just healthier and older.

I always knew it wasn’t our purpose on earth to suffer and that even though we weren’t understood or treated as the same we were the smartest kids in the class and we had each other and hope; I knew though I learned big words at an early age I was still only a child and I had my whole life ahead of me.

I remember for “Show and Tell” one year in Mrs. Acosta’s 3rd grade class playing the piano and showing the kids how it worked. For a day I was treated better than the rest and the kids were in awe and Mrs. Acosta asked me what conservatory I studied at and I told her I learned how to play myself after my mom taught me 4 chords. She looked puzzled. I still play and have written 50 songs on piano that are copy right protected in the Library of Congress and would love the world to hear them one day.

I wish I knew where Cheryl Lightcap is today. I have searched for her numerous times but she probably married and changed her name. I do think of her often and the special times we had together. I also think of the “Gifts She Gave Me”…of courage, wisdom, persistence, perseverance, and somehow it made what I went through not so bad when I saw that she couldn’t see the pictures in the cook books I brought, and how I wanted her to! I remember how Mr. Hill yelled at me for holding her hand and explaining the world to her and always breaking us up. I think Mr. Hill was a PE teacher and shouldn’t have been teaching at all. It seemed he never took one Child Psychology course and had no heart most of the time.

There are many lessons I learned in life.

1. Savor the now and don’t dwell on the past. This is all we have. Give yourself the Present Called Life.

2. Try not to judge others too harshly until you know their story.

3. Make the most of your talents and abilities and down play the rest.

4. Don’t replay negative things others have said about you-it isn’t worth it and it isn’t fair to yourself!

5. Treat others as you want to be treated.

6. Ask others the magic words “How Are You?” and really mean it when you ask them. It probably was the first time anyone asked them all day.

7. Strive to make yourself better, smarter and happier each and every day so you can look back with no regrets.

 

What lessons have you learned in life so far?

Would you be willing to share a few with the readers of Totally Inspired Mind? I would love it if you did.

Paulette Le Pore Motzko