The Giving Tree

This story is so sad but beautifully illustrates how we should try and do and give everything we possibly can to our parents while we can.

The tree this gives mangoes is a metaphor for our parents and the boy represent every child.

One day they will need us and since they gave us LIFE itself,  we can create extraordinary memories to draw back on of the TIME we spent with them.
Paulette Le Pore Motzko

November 6th 2016 9:27 a.m.

Wisdom Story: “The Giving Tree”
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“Once upon a time, there lived a big mango tree. A little boy loved to come and play around it everyday. He climbed to the tree top, ate the mangoes, took a nap under the shadow… He loved the tree and the tree loved to play with him. Time went by, The little boy grew, and he no longer played around the tree.
One day, the boy came back to the tree with a sad look on his face. “Come and play with me,” the tree asked the boy. “I am no longer a kid, I don’t play around trees anymore.” The boy replied, “I want toys. I need money to buy them.” “Sorry, I don’t have money… but you can pick all my mangoes and sell them so you will have money.” The boy was so excited. He picked all the mangoes on the tree and left happily. The boy didn’t come back. The tree was sad.

One day, the boy grown into a man returned. The tree was so excited. “Come and play with me,” the tree said. “I don’t have time to play. I have to work for my family. We need a house for shelter. Can you help me?” “Sorry, I don’t have a house, but you can chop off my branches to build your house.” So the man cut all the branches off the tree and left happily. The tree was glad to see him happy but the boy didn’t come back afterward. The tree was again lonely and sad.

One hot summer day, the man returned and the tree was delighted. “Come and play with me!” The tree said. “I am sad and getting old. I want to go sailing to relax myself. Can you give me a boat?” “Use my trunk to build your boat. You can sail far away and be happy.” So the man cut the tree trunk to make a boat. He went sailing and didn’t come back for a long time.

Finally, the man returned after he had been gone for so many years. “Sorry, my boy, but I don’t have anything for you anymore. No more mangoes to give you.” The tree said. “I don’t have teeth to bite,” the man replied. “No more trunk for you to climb on.” “I am too old for that now,” the man said.

“I really can’t give you anything, the only thing left is my dying roots,” the tree said with sadness. “I don’t need much now, just a place to rest. I am tired after all these years,” the man replied. “Good! Old tree roots are the best place to lean on and rest. Come sit down with me and rest.” The boy sat down and the tree was glad and smiled.

Moral: The tree in the story represents our parents. When we are young, we love to play with them. When we grow up, we leave them and only come back when we need help. Parents sacrifice their lives for us. Never Forget their sacrifices. Give them Love and Care before its too late.”

You must read “The Giving Tree” by Shel Silverstein, which is what this story was abridged from. It is really an adult book told them very childlike an easy to understand way.

Thank you for telling me the author of this Jennie.

Written and Compiled by Paulette Motzko

Updated November 7th 2016

 9:52 a.m.

Photography by Paulette Motzko

Mom and my last Thanksgiving together.

Image of mom-Ramona Le Pore, me-Paulette Motzko, and dad-Ernest Le Pore by Paulette Motzko 

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wisdom.stories.daily

Story from Wisdom Stories

5 thoughts on “The Giving Tree

  1. Paulette please, please read “The Giving Tree” by Shel Silverstein. The story of your post is an abbreviated version of the book. Although it is a children’s book, it is truly for adults. Let me know what you think. I guarantee your library will have the copy.

    1. Thank you for telling me the original name of the book.

      I had it years ago in my hands because my brother had it and I read it and it was so beautiful.

      I believe it has like a white cover and all black sketches in it, from what I remember.

      It’s very deep book but told him very simple way. Thanks for telling me the author’s name and the actual name of the book because I will give reference to it in my post Jennie! Thank you so much!

      1. You are remembering Shel Silverstein’s children’s poetry books, Light in the Attic and Where the Sidewalk Ends. This one, The Giving Tree, is a mostly green cover. The illustrations are pen and ink, just like his other books. Thanks!

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